City Sonnet: Home. April 05, 2020

“Home is a shelter from storms-all sorts of storms.” William J. Bennett

A bedroom in a San Diego lighthouse
Room for chaplain at USS Midway Aircraft Carrier, San Diego
Making friends with the logging community in a recreated outdoor home
Gorilla family at Safari Park Zoo, San Diego

Thanks City Sonnet for hosting this challenge! Fun topics.

CitySonnet photo challenge: Goodbye January

Homework prize: reward system implemented this month to encourage avid (maybe too strong a word here…more like less reluctant) enjoyment of doing school lessons with me
Shopkins’ characters munching on cookie: Photo taken by Ellis

Thank you CitySonnet for hosting this monthly challenge! https://citysonnet.wordpress.com/2020/01/01/january-photo-a-day-challenge-2/

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge #72: Waiting

Waiting can bring so many emotions: excitement, longing, frustration, hopefulness, hopelessness, and so much more. I think your response to waiting depends a lot on your temperament. But the waiting helps when you have company. This pinterest quote captures this sentiment perfectly!

Make It Worth The Wait Love Quotes
Pinterest
“I’m coming down! Get your camera ready.”

Jennifer Mishra weekly photo challenge – Falling Water

The words falling water recall awe- inspiring waterfalls that raise your head naturally to take the sight in with your eyes. The last time I saw a waterfall like that was 13 years ago in Yosemite National Park, yet I aimlessly scrolled through my pictures. Then it dawned on me: falling water can come in different forms and sizes.

Oh duh, after I wrote this entry I went to Jennifer’s actual post and read her challenge tips and ideas, which already pointed out that it’s not limited to waterfalls. Lesson learned: read instructions and visit challenge post first.

Thank you Jennifer for hosting this challenge!

https://witsend-travel.com/2019/05/17/weekly-photo-challenge-falling-water/

Water flow thing at my parent’s farm

Larger picture of the decorative water mill at my folks’ farm

Balboa Park, San Diego

San Diego Zoo

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge: Unexpected. This tadpole of ours.

The topic of sharing something “unexpected” fit right into a picture taken 3 weeks ago. Thank you Anne-Christine for hosting this challenge. https://lagottocattleya.wordpress.com/2019/01/26/lens-artists-photo-challenge-30-unexpected/

An “unexpected” package arrived in the mailbox. It was the size of an upright tissue box and felt like it held nothing but popcorn inside.

I brought the box in and wondered out loud what it could be. My kids immediately dropped what they were doing and asked, “Is it a package for me?”

The package held a clear cube-shaped box with a plastic bag of water in it. This was our mail-order tadpole for our homeschooling science study this term.

Our new tadpole

This tadpole was specifically bred in a Florida laboratory, and it has special characteristics: its tadpole body is transparent; and when it becomes a frog, it will live entirely in water and only surface to breathe. This specific breed is called Pipadae found in Africa and South America. The facts sheet clearly explains that these frogs have never been to those places.

Our tadpole may have went through a quicker metamorphosis due to our overzealous attempt to make it happy with natural rain sounds. We learned that tadpoles like the sound of rain, which can be mimicked by slowly pouring spring water into the tank. As I did more research about this, I learned that this sound hastens metamorphosis.

We can’t tell if it’s a boy or a girl yet. If it makes a sound, it’s a boy. If the body size is larger, it’s a female; although I have no basis for comparison. I’ll just have to wait for that sound or lack of it.

And as I was writing this post, I learned something totally unexpected. Pipidae is the family name for the species African Clawed Frog. It is an invasive and very aggressive species that like to eat anything in its path and cannot be released into our local waters. If you can’t care for it anymore, it could be sent back to the supplier or to a pet store for proper…you know….and environmentally friendly farewell. Also, it could live 5-15 years. Gulp. Knowing beforehand that this species cannot be released into the local waters and its long life-span would’ve been helpful information.

You learn something new and unexpected everyday. With all the surprising facts we’re learning, it’s more likely that the kids will remember this frog life-cycle and frog-care study. Also, they enjoy feeding it and interacting with it, but cleaning the tank is mainly my task. .

p.s. I was going to show a picture of Ribbit metamorphosed into a frog, but its water is too cloudy and not camera-ready. I’ll have to take a picture right after replacing the water.