Simple egg experiment and looking at that egg 5 weeks later

My kids and I did this experiment about a year ago and it was a lot of fun to do. But we didn’t fully understand the concepts covered, like density and buoyancy, so we redid it.

Goal of the experiment was to show how salt water has more density than plain water, which will make the egg float. Floating is buoyancy.

Supplies: a glass cup, enough water to fill half the cup, an egg (uncooked), salt, and a spoon to stir.

Instructions: The recipe called for a certain number of tablespoons of salt with a specific ounce of water, but I just decided to do it my way. See what happens. Even when I follow instructions, it’s a hit or miss. It’s all a learning process anyway.

We filled 3/4 of water in a tall glass cup, added (around) 4 spoon fulls of salt and stirred away. Once the salt particles dissolved, we gently plopped the egg into the cup. It floated down. After many tries of adding salt, stirring, and dropping the egg into the cup, we finally got the egg to float.

The process was slow since the egg had to be gently spooned out of the cup each time we needed to add and stir the salt. Many tries later, the egg finally floated; even with a poke down, the egg bounced back to a float.

SURPRISING RESULT, as a result of not knowing what to do with the egg post experiment: That cup of salt water and egg has been sitting on our kitchen counter for a month now. This was an interesting find…unexpected results! In the beginning, the water level was at the third ring from the top.

Post observational findings:

  1. water slowly evaporates
  2. even with evaporation, the egg still floats
  3. salt crystals formed on top of the egg
  4. No changes occurred on the egg
  5. Still floating, laden with salt crystals on top
  6. After most of the water evaporates, we’ll crack the egg to see if it’s changed

If you have an extra egg and time on your hands, you should try this experiment and see what you find!

I hope I covered the concepts correctly. I’m learning with the kids too and piecing my science knowledge one experiment at a time.

FOTD: Dandelion growth stages. May 21, 2020

On a recent nature walk with my kids, I noticed a few dandelions in different growth states! This was the first time I mentally put together its life cycle. It’s probably my skepticism that a flower could drastically transform from one state to a totally different one.

Funny…how I didn’t differentiate the yellow dandelion flower to a seeding dandelion. Like Homer Simpson slapping his forehead, “D’oh!” All this extra time from sheltering in place makes you question random things.

I’m especially happy with this discovery because it’ll be our next science study. It involves the outdoors and learning about something they see frequently. Also, I don’t have to wonder about which topic to cover next. 

It’ll probably include another nature walk searching for different stages of dandelions, researching its usefulness for health and food, illustrating, watching YouTube videos, etc. Cool! One less stress for homeschooling.

If you’re out talking a walk, take a closer look at them.

Thanks Cee for hosting the flower challenge! Through this, I’m learning details about different kinds of flowers and meeting new blogging friends. Win win!

A new school year already?!

School has already started for many or will start in a matter of days. I can imagine the spectrum of feelings a lot of us are experiencing: first-day jitters, anxiety, excitement, fear, relief, dread, freedom, anticipation, happiness, hope, among others.

I have mixed emotions. Since I’m my kid’s teacher, I feel an enormous amount of pressure. I do love my role and see it as a privilege to homeschool, but it’s daunting at times.

When I feel overwhelmed though, I try to focus on my long-term goals: education involves learning how to tackle new challenges (it’s not all fun and games); comparisons accomplishes nothing positive; celebrate individual successes; choose quality over quantity; and lastly aim to cultivate a discerning and reflective mind.

Being a homeschooling mom teaches me to trust that my kids’ minds are actively processing even when results are not tangible right away. And it makes me wonder the blind faith my parents had in me.

Growing up I was a late bloomer and things clicked way past the time it should’ve occurred. Compound that with the effects of brain trauma from a car accident: I was a hot mess. I fumbled through classes and feigned tummy aches. Despite them all, my parents cheered me on, paid for endless tutoring, and believed (or faked it well) that I would succeed. I wonder how they must’ve felt waiting for me even when I wasn’t showing much progress.

It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop. – Confucius

This year I pray that I will become a better teacher, co-learner and investigator, and guide. I want to have more motivation, patience, and a spontaneous mindset to explore new things. Eeek…I enter it with trepidation. But I know God will sustain me through the doubts and insecurities. In the big scheme of life, my mundane stuff seems insignificant to God, but to Him they are not.

Psalm 120:1:   
“In my distress I called to the LORD, and he answered me.”

Isaiah 40:31:
“But they who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.”

And my hope for kids, parents, teachers, and others involved in raising kids have a blessed, peace-filled, and fruitful school year!! Wishing many “a-ha” moments and joyful hearts pursuing mindfulness, God’s wisdom, and gratefulness.

And how can I forget the most important factor?? Fun and happiness.

Have fun, laugh more than usual, be spunky, love your kids for who they are, and pat yourself on the back more often.

 “Success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.”Winston Churchill

With school starting soon, find curriculum materials at Education.com!

As a homeschooling parent, I’m constantly searching for engaging, interesting, and curriculum to use with my kids. When they were younger, I would make my own learning materials to accommodate their ever-changing interests. But it was a laborious and time-consuming process, so now I use curriculum from various sources to fit my kid’s learning needs.

One resource I frequently use is Education.com. Their various teaching materials cover a broad range of subjects and skills to master for grades preschool to 5th grade. You type in your interested subject in the search box, choose a grade level, and voila! The search results generate rows of sample materials accompanied by user’s review ratings. A favorite feature for me is their colorful and kid-friendly format that piques kids’ curiosities right away.

So when Education.com asked if I would be interested to share a printable worksheet with my teachers, and I was happy to do so. It’s a great resource I use that you may find useful too.

The attached worksheet is a fun word activity that introduces keywords about the upcoming season. It’s one sample of the kinds of resources they provide. I hope you get a chance to check it out and have your kids try it out too.

Children will ‘fall’ in love with this fun autumn crossword puzzle! Also be sure to check out many more great reading activities at Education.com!

*This is not a paid promotion but my honest feedback about my positive experience with Education.com.